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Anish Kapoor @ Martin-Gropius-Bau, Berlin

‘I have nothing to say as an artist, but [my] process has a lot to say’

Anish Kapoor is considered as one of the most important figures in contemporary art. Born in 1954 in Bombay, India, Kapoor started exhibiting his artwork during the late 70’s and the 80’s, when he gained recognition for his sculptures consisting of geometrical or symmetrical shapes. Not so “clean” but rather minimalistic, his sculptures were covered in paint which would go on spreading in the floor, stressing the importance of the surrounding space as part of the showpiece, while at the same time pointing out the nonrepetitive nature of the exhibited work.

Staying faithful to this tradition of his, Anish Kapoor used the whole of the ground floor of the Martin-Gropius-Bau in order to present his works – a 70 in number survey from 1982 to the present – many of them consisting of expendable parts of wax and paint. Sometimes giving the impression of medieval machinery, sometimes that of high-tech parts, while others just using raw material burnt down to pieces or spread through the whole room, Anish Kapoor used wax, PVC skins, stone, glass, steel and mirrors for his installations. Martin-Gropius-Bau, a 19th century imposing building destined to open as a museum of applied arts (and as of 1966, a listed historical monument), served the great purpose of hosting Kapoor’s first major exhibition in the city.

Friday, May 17th the artist held a press conference which he ended with the phrase ‘I have nothing to say as an artist, but [my] process has a lot to say’. Commissioned by the global art platform ‘Berlin Art-Parasites’ i was there in order to cover the event.

 

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